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Priene, Turkey

Priene Turkey


October 17,2011

We awoke to the braying of the donkey in the valley below our hotel in Sirince. The light was muted through the curtains so we knew it was still overcast. It was also very cold but no frost. We went up to the main kitchen area. A couple of other people were sitting outside in the patio but it was a little too cold for us so we choose to eat in the kitchen. It was warm and cozy. The breakfast was filling with its variety of small dishes, egg and a fried crepe along with nice hot coffee.

Priene Turkey

We had read that Ephesus was very busy in the mornings with busloads of tourists from the cruise ships that had docked in Kuşadası. There are also three smaller ruins in the area; Priene, Miletus and Didyma. We looked at a map and Priene was not too far away. We decided to go to it first and then visit Ephesus in the afternoon.

It took about an hour to drive from Sirince to Priene which is located just beyond the major town of Soke. The road just outside of Soke was lined with outlet stores. We recognized a couple of the brands but we were not interested in shopping.


Priene Turkey
Tunnel on the Otoroad between Selcuk and Soke

We turned off and headed towards Güllübahce where Priene is located. One side of the road was the silt filled bay of the Meanders River and the other side was the foothills of Mount Mycale. It was easy to find following the brown signs which are used to signify tourist sites.
There were a couple of buses already in the parking lot. The attendant showed us where to park and we paid the parking fee and went into the small building to pay the entrance. We were excited. It was our first ruins.

Priene is very interesting. The city was built up the hillside which was originally along the bayshore. It is laid out in a grid pattern. The city was part of the Greek Ionian League of cities in the 8th century BC. It was captured and held by the Persians until Alexander the Great conquered the Persian at which time Prience was rebuild. Alexander the Great dedicated the lovely temple of Athena in 334 BC.

Priene Turkey
Column ruins of the Temple of Athena in Priene

It is a lovely setting. The vistas look over the valley below to the distant sea. Above the ruins are the hillsides of Mount Mycale. It is quiet with the wind gently rustling through the pines. I really liked the theater and the stately column ruins of the temple of Athena. Walking along the streets and through the agora (market), you could feel what it was like to live there.

Priene Turkey
Town of Güllübahce in the distance

Priene Turkey
Walls of the city

Priene Turkey
The Agora or market area

Priene Turkey
Stairs leading up to the center of the ruins

Priene Turkey
Cool bulb that was in bloom among the ruins - Drimia maritima

Priene Turkey
We saw these tortoises at all the ruins

Priene Turkey
I loved the brilliant green trees

Priene Turkey
Columns at the ruins of the temple of Athena

Priene Turkey
Details of the top of the columns

Priene Turkey

Priene Turkey

Priene Turkey
Theater - They had the coolest chairs

Priene Turkey

Priene Turkey

Priene Turkey


Comments (3)

Barba Cabot:

Just great Marta! What a wonderful and interesting trip. Photos as usual are beautiful. Breakfast isn't bad either.

M: So descriptive I felt it was (almost) there with you! Don't know much of this area of the world so your educating me along your way. Thanks. Love your text and photos.

Donna in SF:

Marta, I agree with menehune. You make us feel as though we were there, and the photos really make me want to go!

Thanks so much.

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