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July 26, 2007

Pink Martini

Summer in Seattle and it is time again for Pink Martini. We saw them last year at Chateau St. Michelle and it was great. It was the first time we had been to St. Michelle for a concert and we had the perfect day. It was warm but we took a couple of umbrellas. We 'manger sur l'erbe' and a nice bottle of sauvignon blanc. The sun went day, the hot-air balloons floated in the distance and Mt Rainier turned pink in the setting sun.

This year they played at the Zoo. There is a series of concerts to raise money for the zoo every summer. The artists tend to be an eclectic group. It is not as good of venue as St. Michelle. The field is flat, no alcohol is allowed and children are admitted free. But it is a great place to spend a warm mid-week summer night.

I went up to Pasta & Company and got a selection of salads. The shrimp celeriac remoulade was excellent. I want to try to make it. The faro salad was also very nice - faro, chopped tomatoes and sweet onions in a light vinaigrette. A spicy ginger cookie and a nectarine for dessert.

We went early so we could find a parking place. It was very easy at the south side of the zoo. We got in line around 4:45pm at the south entrance. The doors open at 5pm although they didn't let us in until about 5:10pm. By time we got across the zoo and to the concert area, the field had pretty much filled in. I think next time we'll go to the North entrance which is closer to the concert area.

At 6PM, the opening act came on. It was a pretty forgettable duo of a base guitar and mandolin players. They played covers of songs you would not expect such as Paint it Black or Money.

Pink Martini came on just before 7pm and played for over an hour. It was a fun mix of hits from their three albums. Of course, the encore was Brasil. Here's a clip of one of my favorites of the night - "Sympathique" - title cut from their first album.

May 10, 2009

Edmonds Farmers Market

Edmonds Farmers Market

Saturday was such a lovely day. It was sunny, warm and you could see forever. Our local Farmers Market starts at the beginning of May. It doesn't get in full swing until later in June but you can still find interesting selection of food and goods.

Early in May, it is prime time for asparagus. Several of the stands had a good selection. There were also fresh leaks, young lettuce and radishes. The flower stalls were filled with tulips and doing a brisk business for Mothers Day.

I saw a couple of my favorite but I was intrigued with a new cheesemaker - Willapa Hills Farmstead Cheese. Their specialty is blue and sheep cheese. They had a good selection of both fresh and aged cheese. I tried two fresh;the Willapa White and Fresh with Ewe. Both were excellent. The White was shaped similar to a chevre but had a little more tang. But it was the Fresh with Ewe that won me over. It is fresh sheep milk cheese with a blue rind. A lovely lovely cheese. The cheesemaker recommended keeping it for another week. If I can....

I also stopped at another vendor selling beautiful fresh Halibut. For dinner, I rubbed it with the Bengal Masala Rub with Love from Tom Douglas and pan fried it. Add a fresh green salad and my new favorite mashed sweet and regular potatoes. I did not have enough sweet potatoes to make these sweet potatoes and onions but it was still very good with a few regular potatoes thrown in.

The farmers market is located near the firestation and right downtown. Edmonds has a small downtown - with a seaside feel. You can see the sound in the distance and hear the ferry horn. Many of the buildings in the main downtown area are historic and house interesting stores. I stopped by HouseWares to pick up some kitchen cleaning items and admire the stunning designs.

Moving on, I stopped in the Edmonds Bookshop to see the latest best sellers. Nothing caught my fancy. I had two more stops, one at Gallery North to see the current Photography and at Sculptors Workshop pottery sale.

It was good to see everything busy. The weather helped as did Mothers Day weekend. I loved seeing the mothers out. My favorite was the little girl and her mother who came out of one of the day salons. "Mommy - that was so much fun. Can we do come again?". Delightful.

Edmonds Farmers Market

Edmonds Farmers Market

Samish Bay Cheese

May2009-004

Residential street just a block from the market

Edmonds

Traffic circle at the center of downtown

Edmonds

Worldwide headquarters of Rick Steves Europe

July 4, 2009

Edmonds 4th of July Parade

Everybody loves a parade. It has been years since I've been to a parade. The last parade was the Fremont Solstice Parade which is totally different. G had to work this year so I decided to check out the local 4th of July parade in Edmonds.

The crowds had already started to gather around 11:30am. I joined in and followed several families down to where the parade was starting at 6th and Main. People were lined up with their chairs along the route. Today was pretty hot and most of places were in the sun. I walked a block or so and found a place under a large tree in the shade. Perfect.

It wasn't too crowded at all. Everyone right at the sidewalk edge had low chairs. I was talking with another woman and she said this was the 9th parade and it is sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce and local businesses.

It had a little bit of everything - but mostly decorated cars and marching groups. It only lasted an hour but it was fun and different thing to do.

Happy 4th everyone!

Decorated vehicles and marching groups

Edmonds 4th of July Parade

Edmonds 4th of July Parade

Edmonds 4th of July Parade

Edmonds 4th of July Parade

Edmonds 4th of July Parade

Edmonds 4th of July Parade

Edmonds 4th of July Parade

Edmonds 4th of July Parade

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September 27, 2009

Richmond Beach Saltwater Park

Madrona Trees on Bluff above beach

Before we bought our current house in Edmonds, we used to live on the edge of Innis Arden. The history of Innis Arden neighborhood is very interesting. In 1925, William Boeing (yes, the plane builder) bought up much of the land along the Puget Sound north of Seattle, from what is Blue Ridge in Seattle to roughly the county line just south of Edmonds. Much of this area was logged and several communities were built such as Blue Ridge. In 1940, the area north of the Highlands and next to Richmond Beach was laid out as the community named Innis Arden and sold to affluent upper middle class buyers from $1000-$5000 per lot. The cleared land provided unrestricted views across the Sound to the Olympics. The Innis Arden community had strict covenants that prevented buildings and trees to block views. This area continues to have gorgeous unrestricted views and lovely homes built in the older Northwest style. We lived just over the ridge and did not have a view but I would often ride my bike down along the curvy streets and enjoyed the expansive views.

Just next to Innis Arden at the bottom of the hill and along the Sound is Richmond Beach Saltwater Park. It is one of our favorite parks. We feel like it is one of our neighborhood parks even though it is across the county line and in a different city. We used the stairs at the park when we were training for Mt. Whitney. I will often drive over and walk along the beach. I find it very peaceful and calming. Just before Christmas, the city of Shoreline sponsors a huge winter bonfire along with carols provided by the local Christmas Ship.

It has been a while since I visited the park. They were doing renovations last year and we did not visit for a while because of the construction. Friday was a glorious Fall day and I stopped by. Wow! Lots of nice changes.

They have built several new picnic areas, added many new benches and view points and are working to replace the invasive non-native plants with natives along the hillside. They have installed several signs describing the history of the park. It was a sand and gravel mine in the early 1900's which provided building materials for early buildings in Seattle. It also explains the steep terrain. It was sold to King County in 1959 by the Great North Railway. The Parent Map has a great page on the history and details of the park.

There is also a new art installation, Reflex Solaris. It is an interactive sundial. I figured out the sundial portion but totally missed the reflective portion of the artwork. I saw several mirror on the hillside above. At first, I thought they were some type of solar panel for generating electricity. There is one near the upper trail and I noticed that it was just a mirror. Hmmmm... I thought maybe it was for navigation purposes. From the blog post linked earlier, it is a set of mirror that reflect the different solstice and equinoxes. I'm going to have to go back and check out what is reflected along the hillsides. I also think they need something to explain the mirrors - I totally missed it!

I climbed the hill and walked along the upper path. The vistas were amazing in the clear Fall afternoon. Later, I walked down to the beach. Just as you reach the beach is a wonderful 10-foot bronze sculpture of a Salish Welcoming Figure carved by artists Steve Brown, Joe Gobin, and Andy Wilbur. I looked back and saw now how it all fits together - from a sand quarry at the turn of the 20th century to a wonderful public park today.

Here are some photos from my walk (click any picture to enlarge):

Picnic area at Richmond Beach
Picnic area on hillside at Richmond Beach Park
Reflex Solaris Reflex Solaris
Reflex Solaris
New Picnic area at Richmond Beach Richmond Beach Saltwater Park
New picnic area
Walkway at Richmond Beach Hill climb stairs at Richmond Beach
New plantings and stair climb
Beach at Saltwater Park Beach at Saltwater Park
Along the beach
Welcoming Figure Welcoming Figure
Welcoming Figure carved by artists Steve Brown, Joe Gobin, and Andy Wilbur
View from bluffs above Richmond Beach
Panorama View from the Bluffs

October 25, 2009

Kubota Gardens

Kubota Gardens

One of hidden gardens gems of Seattle is Kubota Gardens. Located on 20 acres in South Seattle, the garden is a testament to the endurance of Japanese immigrants and over 50 years of loving labor. The gardens were design by Fujitaro Kubota. He immigrated to the United States in 1907 and started his gardening business in 1923. He designed and planted Japanese style gardens for families here in the Seattle area. In 1927, he bought 5 acres of swamp land off in Rainier Valley and started his dream. Over the years he was able to expand the gardens to 20 acres by the time of his death in 1973. In 1981, the garden was declared a city landmark and in 1987 the city purchased the land. Today, the city continues to maintain and expand the park.

I don't know why we had never visited the gardens before. We knew of the gardens from our friends but never made the time to visit. It is easy to get to and well signed from the Marginal Way exit on I-5.

This year has been outstanding for fall color. The summer was hot enough for the leaves to store ample amount of glucose creating strong reds and yellow as the plants shut down for winter. The Fall is an excellent time to visit. We found a riot of colors throughout the garden.

For more on this history - Kubota Gardens from HistoryLink.org
Directions and information - Kubota Gardens website.


Kubota Gardens Kubota Gardens
Kubota Gardens Kubota Gardens
Kubota Gardens Kubota Gardens
Kubota Gardens Kubota Gardens
Kubota Gardens Kubota Gardens
Kubota Gardens Kubota Gardens
Kubota Gardens Kubota Gardens
Kubota Gardens Kubota Gardens

Kubota Gardens

Seattle Things To Do

March 3, 2010

Pretty in Pink

Spring in the 'hood
Flowering Plum 'Thundercloud'

My neighborhood is pretty in pink - fluffy wispy clouds of pink blossoms! Spring is here.

The early spring has continued here in the Pacific Northwest benefits of El Nino. March came in like a lamb. I sure hope it doesn't go out like a lion. The flowering plums are in full bloom and without any rain, the pink clouds dot the hillsides and neighborhood. I feel like I'm walking in a forest of pink cotton candy.

I took my camera with me on my walk today and captured everything that was in pink. Check out what I found that was 'pretty in pink'.

Spring in the 'hood

Spring in the 'hood
Mediterranean Pink Heather

Spring in the 'hood
Flowering Quince

Spring in the 'hood

Azalea

Spring in the 'hood
Rhododendron

Spring in the 'hood
Camelia

Spring in the 'hood
Pieris japonica

Spring in the 'hood



And look what else I found! I couldn't believe it. Definitely pretty in pink.


Spring in the 'hood

Spring in the 'hood


March 30, 2010

Edmonds Waterfront

Edmonds Waterfront

I need a little reminder of the beautiful days we had last month. Here are a few pictures of the Edmonds waterfront area. There are several public art installations along the waterfront. This guy is crawling up the stairs from the sand. It is part of the work called "The Locals" by Georgia Gerber.

Farther along the waterfront is a fishing pier. It has a whimsical metal art work representing salmon swimming - "School of Fish" by Buster Simpson. Turning around - a great view of the marina and Olympic mountains in the distance. Art by mother nature.

More on the public art in Edmonds - Public Art Collection

Edmonds Waterfront
"School of Fish"

Edmonds Waterfront
View from fishing pier


April 12, 2010

Lakewold Garden

Lakewold Gardens

We did not have any special plans for Easter Sunday so we decided to spend it in a garden. One possibility was to go to the Tulip fields again since they were in bloom but it would have been terribly crowded on Sunday. Instead we decided to go South to Lakewold Garden in Lakewood just sound of Tacoma.

We typically visit in mid-March so this would be our first visit in early Spring. The day was overcast but the garden was lovely. And we had it almost to ourselves.

The gardens were started in 1910 as part of a summer home on Lake Gravely. The original design was influenced by the work of the Olmstead Brothers. The property was sold several times over the years until it was sold to George Corydon and Eulalie Wagner in 1938. Eulalie Wagner loved to garden. The landscape gardener, Thomas Church, first visited the garden in 1958 and returned to advice on the garden over the years. The garden opened to the public in 1989.

We love the location and the different rooms of the garden. As you arrive, you can walk along a long circular driveway lined with 20 feet Rhododendrons. This takes you to the door of the house which looks over the Flag Pole Lawn. There is a large Paulonia tree that we would love to see in bloom but we will need to return late in May or early June since it is late to bloom.

From the Flag lawn, you can enter into the small fern garden room. It is filled with interesting small shade and woodland plants. The triliums were in full bloom. Exiting the Fern room, you walk along the brick path lined with boxwood beds filled with tulips. The two majestic Mt. Fuji cherry trees were budded but not yet in bloom. The walkway leads to a lovely statue at the end of the path - but off to the side is a curious Quartrefoil pool. I love the pool and the symmetry but it is the hardest thing in the world to photograph.

Continuing down a side path, you can enter into several rooms lined with Japanese Maples and other beautiful trees such as Stewartia and Parrotia with beautiful bark. There are several trees of distinction in the garden. There are also several view points across the lake or up the lawns to the house. There is a new rock garden that is still getting established. Along several of the walkways were large naturalized swatches of fawn lilies (Erythronium). We have several native versions of this flower but I love the larger garden varieties.

Returning to the house, there is a large wisteria arbor over the outdoor eating area. Nearby is a knot garden, rose garden and perennial beds. Throughout the garden were several varieties of cherries in bloom. I loved the light yellow cherry blossoms of the Ukon cherry.

Before leaving, we made a stop at The Garden Shop to make a couple of plant purchases. We had to get a couple of blue poppies and a replacement Chilean Fire Bush (Embothrium coccineum).

Here are some photos of the garden:

Lakewold Gardens
Driveway to the house entry

Lakewold Gardens
Cherry Blossom

Lakewold Gardens
Brick walk

Lakewold Gardens
Garden bench

Lakewold Gardens
Quartrefoil Pool and flowering cherry

Lakewold Gardens
Closeup of statue at end of brick walk

Lakewold Gardens
Woodland room

Lakewold Gardens
Garden detail

Lakewold Gardens
House

Lakewold Gardens
Wisteria arbor

Lakewold Gardens
Knot garden

Lakewold Gardens
Fawn Lilies - Erythronium

Lakewold Gardens
Hunter statue along the Flag Pole Lawn

Related Posts: Lakewold Garden - May 2007

Tacoma Things To Do

May 10, 2010

South Puget Sound Prairies

Swale abloom with Camassia quamash

Prairie is not a place you imagine of when you think of Washington state or the Puget Sound area. But prairie grasslands were an intrinsic part of native American food sources. These rolling grasslands were scattered throughout the sound and can still be found south of Olympia. The grassy areas may originally have been created by the glaciers that covered the area and left open rocky meadows. Native Americans maintained these grasslands by burning them to restore the plants and keep the larger invasive plants at bay. The predominant plant they harvested was blue camas - Camassia quamash. These plants in the Agavaceae family have starchy bulbs that they harvested in the early fall, roasted and dried for food throughout the year. They also harvested other bulbs and berries that grew well in these savannah grasslands.

Today, the prairies are an endangered land. Only about 2% of the grasslands still survive. Much of it was used as farmland and later housing. Once a year, the Glacial Heritage Preserve is open to the public on Prairie Appreciation Day which was last Saturday. This prairie is managed by Thurston County Parks, the Washington department of Fish and Wildlife and restored by the Nature Conservancy of Washington and Friends of Puget Prairies. They have done a tremendous amount of work to clear the invasive non-native plants such as scotch broom from the fields.

Early May is prime time for the blooms. The roads in the area are lined with blue camas. Last Saturday was sunny with lots of fluffy white clouds. The blue blossoms created a blue haze over the grassland. I took the longer self-guided trail along the edge of the prairie and was amazed at the fields.

Near by is the more well known prairie - Mima Mounds. It is a lovely place to walk through these strange mounds that no one really understands. Was it a glacier? An earthquake? Gophers? May is a wonderful time to visit since the mounds are tinged in blue with camas and violets but anytime is a good time to visit and contemplate the mystery.

Glacial Heritage Preserve

Camas blue hills

Camassia and Lomatium
Camas and Lomatium

Camas - Camassia quamash

Glacial Heritage Preserve
Fritillaria affinis
Chocolate lily - Fritillaria affinis

Armeria maritima
Sea thrift - Armeria maritima

Camassia leichtlinii

Glacial Heritage Preserve

May 14, 2010

Olympic Sculpture Park

Olympic Sculpture Garden
"Eagle" by Alexander Calder at the Olympic Sculpture Garden along the Seattle Waterfront

The Olympic Sculpture Park opened in the Winter of 2007. I was very excited when it opened. The area where it is located is one of my favorite vistas in Seattle. Located at the end of the waterfront near Pier 70 and at the beginning of Myrtle Edwards Park, it has always been an outstanding location for views of the Olympic Mountains and Puget Sound.

I arrived in Seattle in the mid-70's and my first job was working in a pathology lab in the Denny Regrade area just up from where the garden is located today. Our building had stunning vistas out over Elliott Bay. Ferries seem to glide across the water. On blustery days, the wind would whip up white caps while we were secure in our offices. Myrtle Edwards Park was located just about 4 blocks down from work. Later, when I worked on Elliott Way, I would walk from the Magnolia Bridge to Pier 70. It was a contrast of the working soul from the grain elevators which shipped out the wheat from Eastern Washington to Asia to the sea of Japanese import cars waiting to be transported down the West Coast.

Several Microsoft and other software professionals had a vision. A sculpture garden to rival the view. They banded together and slowly created this extension of the Seattle Art Museum devoted to sculpture and native plants.

I had visited the garden right after it opened and loved the mixture of art and native plants. I made one more visit the following year. I had intended to return but through layoffs and changes, I never made it back.

I had a chance to return last Friday on a beautiful sunny May day. How it has grown! I parked nearby on Western Avenue and entered the garden through the Aspen Grove. The leaves were quivering in the gentle wind. The white bark provided a contrast to the stark black sculptures scattered through the grove.

I exited the grove and walked over the Seattle Cloud Cover Glass Bridge down to the waterfront. The bridge to the water passes by Schubert Sonata by Mark di Suvero and Love & Loss by Roy McMakin. I continued into Myrtle Edwards Park pathway. I sat among the daisies and let the air gently blow through my hair. The Olympics were in the distance, the PI globe turned behind me while joggers ran by.

I returned to the park and the Z path. The orange steel "Eagle" sculpture by Calder towered above the rail tracks and meadows. The path curved back to the skyline of Seattle. I took one of the side paths through the dogwoods covered with ivory colored blossoms to the rusty undulating steel sculptures of "Wake" by Richard Serra . I love walking through the steel canyons with the "Eagle" and Space Needle peeking above.

The park is free and open to the public. On the warm day, joggers, school children, sun lovers, mothers and senior all enjoyed the art, native plants and gorgeous sea views. Highly recommended.

Olympic Sculpture Garden
"Stinger" by Tony Smith

Olympic Sculpture Garden
"Typewriter Eraser" by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen

Olympic Sculpture Garden

Olympic Sculpture Garden

Olympic Sculpture Garden
Waterfront by park

Olympic Sculpture Garden
Myrtle Edwards Park

Olympic Sculpture Garden
Seattle Skyline and Olympic Sculpture Park Shoreline Park

Olympic Sculpture Garden
PI Globe from Myrtle Edwards Park

Olympic Sculpture Garden

Olympic Sculpture Garden

Olympic Sculpture Garden

Olympic Sculpture Garden
"The Wake" by Richard Serra

Olympic Sculpture Garden

Seattle Things To Do

June 2, 2010

PowellsWood Garden

PowellsWood Garden

I finally had a chance to visit PowellsWood Garden in Federal Way. This is a relatively new garden. It has started to be open to the public more frequently than a few special days. There was a special open house on during the Federal Way's Buds & Bloom Festival on Mothers Day. It was warm and sunny so I headed south to take a look.

The garden is amazing. The Powells purchased the land in 1992 and started turning what was previously a dumping ground into a spectacular 2 acre urban garden. Much of the early years were spent restoring the soil polluted from the years of dumping. Once the soil was restored, the plantings began.

Today there are 8 different garden 'rooms'. You enter with the bright entry garden which has a tropical feel. Then you move to the entry overlooking the perennial borders. The stairway is absolutely stunning. I loved the large leafed petasites and hostas on one side and ferns and rhododendrons on the other. Meandering on, you come along a stream lined with ligularias and a pond. Next are the shade and woodland gardens which take advantage of the towering Douglas fir trees. Circling back, you move into the Spring garden lined with flowering cherries. These were finished blooming but I could image what a cloud of blossoms they were in the spring. The final room is the new House Garden which I loved. It used lots of interesting combination of dark foliage and hot yellow and orange flowers.

I really want to return and see how the beds progress through the summer. They are participating in the Garden Conservancy's "Open Days" Tour on June 12th. They are also open Tues - Saturday 10am - 3pm. For more information - see the PowellsWood website.

PowellsWood Garden

PowellsWood Garden
Petasites japonicus

PowellsWood Garden
Hosta

PowellsWood Garden
Stairway to Perennial Border Garden

PowellsWood Garden

PowellsWood Garden
Perennial Border area

PowellsWood Garden
Cherries leafing out in the Spring Garden

PowellsWood Garden
House Garden

PowellsWood Garden


August 27, 2010

Meadowdale Park

Meadowdale Park

I am back in training. We want to see the silversword in its native habitat so that means we have to hike down into the crater of Haleakala on Maui. I am not certain yet what hike we plan to do - Sliding Sands or Halemalu'u. Sliding Sands definitely looks to be an easier hike. Both start at the crater edge which is about 8,000 ft and descend about 1500 to 2000 feet into the crater.

I need to get in shape to be able to do the hike so I've started training. I'm starting out rather easy with a local hike - Meadowdale Park.

I normally use this park in the winter since it is a great place to go off season but since it is so close, I am using it as a training hike. It is a 2.2 mile round trip with a 450 elevation gain. It is good to trail to start.

I hiked the trail this week before the weather turned. I loved the filtered light from the alders and the babbling stream. It was a clear crisp day when I reached the beach. The Olympics were in full view. I was intrigued by the two fishermen along the shore where the stream emptied into the sound. The tide was low and the old fishing pier north of the beach was exposed so I walked along the beach. Several Asian women were harvesting seaweed along the rocks. Whidbey Island peaked through the pier blocks under the dock. It was a little spooky hearing the footsteps above.

I meandered back and climbed up along trail of Lund Gulch. It is such a great resource to have such a wonderful open space to explore. Hopefully it will do the trick and get me in shape for Haleakala. Here is a wonderful trip report of the Halemalu'u trail.

Haleakala from 14ers.com



Meadowdale Park
Just leaving the parking lot and starting the decent into Lunds Gulch

Meadowdale Park
Dappled summer sunlight along the trail

Meadowdale Park
Alders climb high above the trail

Meadowdale Park
Sword ferns shadow the trail

Meadowdale Park
Along the rocky beach

Meadowdale Park
Old fishing pier - now a beach camp

Meadowdale Park
Peaking under the pier toward Whidbey Island

Meadowdale Park
Trains rumble by on their way to Canada

Meadowdale Park
Late Summer day along the Puget Sound with the Olympic Mountains in the distance

Meadowdale Park
End of Summer - the chill is in the air


October 27, 2010

Edmonds Walks

Edmonds Waterfront on a Fall Day

We are planning on hiking into the crater at Haleakala on Maui. This is not going to be easy. First off - the altitude. The trail starts at visitors center which is at 9774 ft. The hike down will take us to about 8400ft. Coming back up is going to be a gruel - both with the thin air but also the slippery sliding pumice. Also no shade.

I've been walking and hiking to get in shape. We've been able to do 3 hike2 (one a week) in October. These have been usually 5 miles with about 1500 ft gain - just about what we plan on doing.

I've also been walking around the Edmonds bowl. Usually I walk along the waterfront which is flat but I've switch to going up towards the top of the crest above Edmonds. I have been using MapMyWalk website to get ideas, plan my walk and measure my mileage. It has been a great tool. Today I did a four mile walk that I found from the suggested walks. It was a beautiful day. I started downtown - parked right across from Rick Steves and the walked over to Walnut and the up to Yost Park. Then turn south and then back to down to the sound on Pine. The view was gorgeous. The Olympics were all dusted with snow. We had an early storm and it brought snow to all the mountains. Mt Rainier where I hiked last week had 18 inches! How quickly it changes.

I walked all the way to the waterfront where I was greeted with the beautiful scene in the picture above. I walked along the marina and then back up to my car. It took me an hour and half. Not great but a good workout. And I got about 400 ft elevation workout on the way up.

October 29, 2010

Another great Fall walk

Fall Walk in Edmonds WA

Another break in the weather. The clouds cleared off and sun came out. I went for a walk again using the same route. It is an excellent workout with just the right amount of uphill, downhill and level. It continues to take me about 1 1/2 hours to do four miles. Not great but it will do.

Fall Walk in Edmonds WA
Heading downhill - I will walk all the way to the waterfront below the building in the center

Fall Walk in Edmonds WA
House all decorated for Halloween

Fall Walk in Edmonds WA
Olympic Beach - a different angle - I do like the previous shot better

Fall Walk in Edmonds WA
End of the Marina - The beautiful Puget Sound - time to head back to the car

November 21, 2010

Snow .... and a Blue Moon

First Snow of Winter 2010

November and December are always unpredictable. It always keeps G on edge. When will the first frost happen? How long will it freeze? Will it snow? How many days of rain? The weather forecasters predict a colder and wetter year than normal for the Pacific Northwest. It started today. Snow arrived around 10am but fortunately it did not stick around. It never got warmer than 36 degrees but that was fine. I spent the day cooking.

But tonight, the clouds have parted, the sky is clear and the thermometer is dropping. It is 30 degrees at 7pm. It will probably get down to the mid 20's. But the moon has come out. Tonight is a blue moon. I thought a blue moon is the second full moon in a month but there are actually two definitions. The second definition is the third full moon of a four moon season.


"The Old Farmer’s Almanac defined a Blue Moon as an extra full moon that occurred in a season. One season – winter, spring, fall, summer – typically has three full moons. If a season has four full moons, then the third full moon may be called a Blue Moon."
- What makes November full moon a blue moon?

I have never heard that before. I've only heard the more recent definition of the 2nd full moon in a month. No matter what the definition - it is beautiful.

November Blue Moon


Here's one of my favorite versions of the song "Blue Moon" - Cowboy Junkies


December 23, 2010

Christmas Lights at the Edmonds Yacht Club

It was a rain-free night so we decided to take the opportunity to check out the lights in Edmonds. Our main destination was the Edmonds Yacht Club and the public docks just next to Anthony's restaurant. The night was perfect for a walk and the lights were beautiful.

Merry Christmas everyone! I hope you have a wonderful holiday.

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