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Palmina Challenge #1

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Our weekly Sunday Slow Suppers is finished, and our next weekly cooking challenge will not start until July, so I decided to challenge myself in the meantime.

You may recall that back in February I attended the mini Slow Bowl in the Santa Ynez area, and one of the wineries we visited was Palmina. I blogged about it here.

I joined their Stagioni wine club that day, and I have received two shipments of three bottles each. The fun thing is that for each wine, there is a recipe to go with it.

So, my challenge to myself is to prepare the recipe that goes with each wine. That means controlling myself and not opening the bottles when they first arrive. So, here goes with the first recipe and wine.

First, the wine. Palmina's tasting notes say:

Traminer is an ancient grape varietal, with written notes on this green-skinned grape going back to the 11th century. It is named after the alpine village of Tramin (Tremeno on the Italian side), and is likely the parent of the more well known Gerwurtztraminer (Meaning spicy Traminer). Many ampelographers (those who study the orgin of wine) believe that Traminer may be the most ancient cultivar still in existence. Obviously a hardy grapefine with not only its longevity but its preference for cool climates, it thrives in the maritime, hilltop Alisos Vineyard.
A wine that attains even more character with cellaring, Traminer is also delightful immediately at release. It is a beautiful food wine, particularly with the hearty dishes of its orgin. Dishes with eggs, potatoes, herbs and cheese will never disappoint!

I bet you didn't know you would get a history lesson along with the recipe, did you!

Here is the link to the recipes and tasting notes for the Spring shipment - three wines and three recipes. The first one is:

Spring Flatbread with Traminer

Pizza Skin
This will make about 10 pizza skins - those that you don't use can be wrapped and frozen.

1.25 cups water at 100 degrees
1 T Dried Yeast
2.5 C "00" Flour
1.5 T Sea Salt

1. Sprinkle the yeast onto the water. The yeast will absorb water then sink. Leave it until it develops a frothy head.
2. Mix the flour and sea salt together, then add the yeast mix.
3. Knead for 20 minutes on a floured board, then put the dough into a floured bowl and cover with a dish towel and let rise for 30 minutes.
4. Place a pizza stone in the barbecue or oven and heat to 450 degrees.
5. Tear off lime-size pieces of dough and use a rolling pin and floured board to roll them thin and even. Place the dough on the pizza stone and cook until set, about a minute.

Topping:
2 T Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1/2 C Ricotta Cheese
1 T Dried Tarragon
Zest of half a Meyer Lemon
1/2 t Sea Salt
2 T grated Parmigiano Cheese
1 Leek, white and light green parts, thinly sliced.
1 Egg
1 T Breadcrumbs

1. Drizzle the pizza skin with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and brush to coat it entirely.
2. Mix the ricotta, tarragon, lemon zest and sea salt together, then spoon onto the pizza skin, spreading it evenly out over the entire skin, reading to 1/2" from the edge.
3. Sprinkle the Parmigiano, breadcrumbs & leek on top, then break the egg in the middle of the pizza. Drizzle with the remaining olive oil. Cook on the pizza stone in a barbecue or oven at 450 degrees for 5-6 minutes or until the egg white is fully cooked.
4. Bring the pizza out and let it rest for 1-2 minutes and slice and serve.

Comments (1)

This sounds like a fun challenge. I bet that flatbread will be wonderful with that wine.

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