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Canning Tomatoes - Part 3

Now we are really getting to the fun part - actually making and canning tomato sauce to use during the winter months! And what better recipes to use than Marcella Hazan's from Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking!

We had both regular Romas and San Marzano tomatoes ripe in our garden, so I picked 10 pounds of each. San Marzano (the larger ones) are on the left, and regular Romas on the right.

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I wanted them to be in separate sauces so we could compare the taste. In Marcella's pasta chapter, there are several tomato sauces, two of which have identical ingredients (in different proportions), but the big difference between these two is that in one the veggies are put in raw, and in the second, they are sauteed first.

I used the Romas in the recipe with crudo vegetables and the San Marzano in the recipe with the sauteed veggies. Take a look at how the completed sauces look.

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Used: 20 pounds of tomatoes (10 lb of each variety)

Yield: 16 pints - 10 pints crudo & 6 pints sauteed

Tomato Sauce with Olive Oil
and Chopped Vegetables

“The carrot and celery in this sauce are put in a crudo, which means without the usual separate and preliminary sauteéing procedure, along with the tomatoes. The sweetness of carrot and the fragrance of celery contribute depth to the fresh tomato flavor of the sauce.”

For 6 servings

2 pounds fresh, ripe tomatoes,
prepared as described [above],
or 2 cups canned imported Italian plum
tomatoes, cut up, with their juice
2/3 cup chopped carrot
2/3 cup chopped celery
2/3 cup chopped onion
Salt
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 to 1 1/2 pounds pasta

Recommended pasta • This is an all-purpose sauce for most cuts of factory-made pasta, particularly spaghettini and penne.

1. Put either the prepared fresh tomatoes or the canned in a saucepan, add the carrot, celery, onion, and salt, and cook with no cover on the pan at a slow, steady simmer for 30 minutes. Stir from time to time.
2. Add the olive oil, raise the heat slightly to bring to a somewhat stronger simmer, and stir occasionally, while reducing the tomato to as much of a pulp as you can with the back of the spoon. Cook for 15 minutes, then taste and correct for salt.
Note • May be frozen when done.


Tomato Sauce with Sautéed Vegetables
and Olive Oil

“This is a denser, darker sauce than the preceding
two cooked longer over a base of sautéed vegetables.”

2 pounds fresh, ripe tomatoes,
prepared as described [above],
or 2 cups canned imported Italian plum
tomatoes, cut up, with their juice
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
2/3 cup chopped carrot
2/3 cup chopped celery
2/3 cup chopped onion
Salt
1 to 1 1/2 pounds pasta

Recommended pasta • Most factory-made pasta will carry this sauce well, in particular substantial shapes such as rigatoni, ridged penne, or bucatini.

1. If using fresh tomatoes: Put the prepared tomatoes in an uncovered saucepan and cook at a very slow simmer for about 1 hour. Stir from time to time, mashing any pieces of tomato against the sides of the pan with the back of a wooden spoon. Transfer to a bowl with all their pieces.
If using canned tomatoes: Proceed with Step 2 and add the tomatoes where indicated in Step 3.
2. Wipe the saucepan dry with paper towels. Put in the olive oil and the chopped onion, and turn on the heat to medium. Cook and stir the onion until it becomes colored a very pale gold, add the carrot and celery, and cook at lively heat for another minute, stirring once or twice to coat the vegetables well.
3. Add the cooked fresh tomatoes or the canned, a large pinch of salt, stir thoroughly, and adjust heat to cook in the uncovered pan at a gentle, but steady simmer. If using fresh tomatoes, cook for 15 to 20 minutes; if using the canned, simmer for 45 minutes. Stir from time to time. Before turning off the heat, taste and correct for salt.
Note • May be frozen when done.

Comments (3)

Nancy, you have been busy! Should I look for a tomato sauce stand on the corner of 10 and Hwy 79? It looks great, but lots of work. My problem is always, "Ok, now where do I PUT all these jars?"

Wow, my mouth is watering. They both look so good.

sheri:

Looks delicious,Nancy. I am going to try this next year for sure!

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This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on October 27, 2010 11:00 PM.

The previous post in this blog was Canning Tomatoes - Part 2.

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