Entries from Churches in Venice tagged with 'Tintoretto'

San Pietro Martire

Many people visit Murano to shop for glass, but there are a couple of churches on the island that are well worth a visit. One is the Basilica di SS. Maria e Donato and the other is this church...

San Stin

Not all of Venice's demolished churches have memorial plaques like San Geminiano does, but most of them have something left behind, even if it’s simply the name of a calle or campo. The church of San Stin, in the sestiere...

San Trovaso

There are a couple of quirky things about this church that every guidebook mentions. First is the name - there’s no saint in existence called San Trovaso. The real name of this church is Ss. Gervasio e Protasio, brother...

San Rocco

I’ve visited this church many times but until last November, every visit was more-or-less a blur because I visited the Scuola next door first and was in a complete Tintoretto overload haze. So last year, I went to the...

San Cassiano

It’s a bit of a surprise to walk in and see how pretty this church is, since the outside is a rather nondescript mustard-brown box. Founded in the 8th century or so, this church has been rebuilt and remodeled...

Santa Maria del Soccorso

This little church was part of a charitable institution founded in 1580 by famous Venetian courtesan and poet, Veronica Franco (1546-1591), who is the subject of the book, The Honest Courtesan by Margaret Rosenthal, and the 1998 film, Dangerous...

San Lazzaro dei Mendicanti

So as I said, it took me a while to find this church but I finally did and even better, I found it open! In the 13th century, there was a hospice and refuge for lepers in Dorsoduro (Lazarus...

Sant'Anna

I was eager to find this one, not just because it’s the church of my name saint, but also because I wasn’t sure if this church was still standing or not (it’s not included on the Patriarch of Venice...

Santa Caterina

A deconsecrated church in Cannaregio with a couple of great stories and some beautiful art that’s still in Venice though no longer in the church itself... Santa Caterina was founded in the 11th century as a monastery and then...

San Zaccaria

On many of the "must-see in Venice" lists, San Zaccaria is a church with lots of layers and art that spans the centuries and styles – it’s a fascinating place but even someone not into churches should pop into...

San Gallo

Some call it a church, some an oratory – either way, San Gallo is no longer open for Mass but is used occasionally for art exhibits. I walked by this sweet little church many times before finally finding it...

Sant' Iseppo

Also known as San Giuseppe di Castello, this church was built in 1512 by the Venetian Senate in response to popular demand for a church dedicated to Joseph, father of Jesus. The church complex also included a small convent...

Gesuati (Santa Maria Rosario)

This is the church that the Dominicans built on the Zattere when they outgrew Santa Maria della Visitazione. Built in 1726-43 by architect Giorgio Massari, this is one of many (too many?) big white Baroque churches in Venice. But...

San Moise

A wooden church dedicated to San Vittore was built on this location in the 8th century; it was rebuilt in 947 by Venetian nobleman Moise Venier who rededicated it to his name saint, Moses (San Moise). This is one...

Gesuiti (Santa Maria Assunta)

I love this church. I should probably confess that I loved Elvis’ Graceland too. It’s not an off-the-wall comparison, believe it or not. Both places are completely unique and kinda crazy because of their over-the-top decor. J.G. Links (Venice...

Madonna dell' Orto

The most beautiful gothic church in town with one of the loveliest facades in Venice. Of all the many red brick-fronted churches, this one is special with its white stone tracery, trim, and sculpture.The church was originally named for...

Santa Maria Mater Domini

This lovely Early Renaissance church is another one of my favorites. It’s small and elegant and feels like a place that’s been much loved by many generations of grandmothers, plus it has one of my very favorite paintings in...

San Marziale

Don’t let the nondescript exterior fool you, this is one of the strangest churches in Venice. Strange in a good way though – it was well worth the many tries it took to finally get inside this one. San...

San Giorgio Maggiore

One of Venice’s most beautiful and familiar vistas is the island of San Giorgio Maggiore and the great temple of a church that Palladio built there. Many artists have painted it, millions of tourists have photographed it, John Ruskin...

The churches of Cannaregio

There are 32 churches in this sestiere; most of them are Catholic but there are also an Evangelical Lutheran church and five synagogues. So many great ones here, including the most beautiful Gothic church in town (Madonna dell’Orto), the most...