Entries from Churches in Venice tagged with 'campanile'

San Marcuola

Several interesting tidbits about the church of San Marcuola~ • It's one of the few churches on the Grand Canal • It’s dedicated to a “Venetian” saint that doesn’t exist • Has one of 8 partially demolished bell towers...

Santa Ternita

Santa Ternita was a parish church in Castello, founded around 1026 and built with funds from the Celsi and Sagredo families (the Sagredo’s enormous 15th century palazzo is nearby). The church was located at Castello 3026 next to the...

PhotoHunt: Vertical

The campanile of San Marco is the tallest bell tower in Venice and is a strong vertical that's visible from many parts of the city. Thanks for visiting and have a good weekend. See a list of upcoming Saturday Photo...

Santa Sofia

There are a bunch of churches in Venice that are hard to find, but once you can get there, you CAN see them. Not so with the little church of Santa Sofia – this one is easy to miss...

Campanili (let's play!)

I hope you all had a fantastic holiday season. Best wishes for a wonderful new year - I hope that we all will be able to spend some time in Venice (or anywhere else on your travel wish list) in...

An Update on Sant'Aponal

This photo just makes me smile. Thanks so much to Andrew for answering my call for someone to check this out, and also for sending the photo to me and giving permission to post it here. Andrew took this...

San Pietro Martire

Many people visit Murano to shop for glass, but there are a couple of churches on the island that are well worth a visit. One is the Basilica di SS. Maria e Donato and the other is this church...

Sant'Aponal

Here’s another “chiesa chiusa al culto” (church closed for worship). And closed for anything else too, as far as I know. Sometimes these closed churches pop open for a Biennale exhibit or such, but I haven’t heard of Sant’Aponal...

San Bartolomeo

Founded in 840 and originally dedicated to Greek saint Demetrius, this church was rebuilt in 1170, became a parish church, and was rededicated to the apostle Bartholomew (the church is known as San Bortolomio in Venetian dialect). Several renovations since...

San Luca

After the fall of the Republic, there were so many drastic changes to Venice’s churches and religious institutions. During the decades of the 19th century when Venice was under French and Austrian rule, many churches, convents, and monasteries were...

Santa Fosca

There are two churches in Venice dedicated to this third century teenage virgin martyr saint – the exquisite Byzantine church on the island of Torcello and this former parish church in Cannaregio. This Santa Fosca was founded in the...

San Sebastiano

This is a “must see” church, and don’t let the fact that it’s been under-going a comprehensive restoration for many years stop you from visiting. Every time I’ve visited, something new has been unveiled, and the restoration work being...

San Canciano

San Canciano looks kind of rough from the outside but is quite pretty inside. It’s a lacy romantic feminine church, maybe it’s the floral carvings and all the pastels - pink walls and light blue marble. I always enjoy...

San Stin

Not all of Venice's demolished churches have memorial plaques like San Geminiano does, but most of them have something left behind, even if it’s simply the name of a calle or campo. The church of San Stin, in the sestiere...

San Maurizio

In my last post, I wrote about the Museo della Musica di Venezia, housed in the deconsecrated church of San Maurizio. Here’s some more info about the church itself and its history. This church was founded in the 9th century...

T is for Towers

The Leaning Tower of Pisa is the most famous tilting tower in Italy, but Venice has several of her own. This bell tower (campanile) belongs to the big Gothic church of Santo Stefano. When you look at the base of...

San Trovaso

There are a couple of quirky things about this church that every guidebook mentions. First is the name - there’s no saint in existence called San Trovaso. The real name of this church is Ss. Gervasio e Protasio, brother...

Santa Croce degli Armeni

The Armenian church is one of the most mysterious in Venice. This little church is so embedded in the urban fabric, who knows what it even looks like? The entrance is within a sotoportego, and you can get only...

The bell tower of San Vidal

This is such a pretty campanile. The San Vidal bell tower is older than the rebuilt church, or at least its foundations are. This tower was damaged by fire in 1105, by earthquake in 1347, restored again in 1680,...

San Cassiano

It’s a bit of a surprise to walk in and see how pretty this church is, since the outside is a rather nondescript mustard-brown box. Founded in the 8th century or so, this church has been rebuilt and remodeled...

The Cloisters of San Salvador

There’s so much to say about the church of San Salvador that it’s going to take several posts. I thought I’d start with the cloisters of the former monastery and also the campanile. Don’t think I’m crazy if I...

PhotoHunt: Standing

This week's PhotoHunt theme is "Standing." There used to be over 100 bell towers in Venice but some of them collapsed or were demolished; today there are 66 still standing. The most well-known is this one, the campanile di...

Bell Tower Trivia

Some various and sundry details about the bell towers of Venice. The campanile di San Marco is the tallest of them all, of course, at 315 feet (97 meters). Second place is a tie between the Frari and San Francesco...

PhotoHunt: Half

This week's PhotoHunt theme is "Half." This is the top half of the bell tower (campanile) of the church of San Pietro di Castello in Venice. A beautiful Renaissance tower that leans a bit, though you can't really tell...

La Celestia (Cristo Re alla Celestia)

Another Venetian church with a miracle-working Madonna legend, this church is unusual in that it reincarnated after a long period of being closed (it was shut down by the French along with so many others in the early 19th...

Dragon Bones

You gotta love the Internet. Yesterday I wrote that I'd love to see the dragon bones in the church of San Donato, and within hours I had photos of them in my email box! And even better, my blog friend...

Venice in 1911

A cool old photo showing the rebuilding of the campanile of San Marco which had collapsed in 1902. That wooden scaffolding looks very interesting. I checked the Venezia webcam today and it looks like they are still doing foundation...

San Trovaso guardian

Another scary face guarding the entrance to a bell tower, this one is truly creepy. He's found over the door to the campanile of the church of San Trovaso in Dorsoduro, and supposedly he keeps away any evil spirits who...

The Oratory and the Campanile

Behind the Torcello cathedral is the small Oratory of San Marco Evangelista, built on the site where St. Mark rested on his way to Venice (or more accurately, where the guys who stole his body rested?). Legend has it...

San Zaccaria

On many of the "must-see in Venice" lists, San Zaccaria is a church with lots of layers and art that spans the centuries and styles – it’s a fascinating place but even someone not into churches should pop into...

San Barnaba

If my nephews were writing this, they’d tell you that this is, by far, the most important and most interesting church in Venice because of the fact that it was featured in the movie “Indiana Jones and the Last...

San Giobbe

One of the first Renaissance buildings in Venice, this pretty pink church is dedicated to San Giobbe (St. Job) who technically was never a Christian at all since he’s an Old Testament character. But Job’s famous trials (and the fact...

Santa Margherita

The mascherone (grotesque face) guarding the bell tower of Santa Maria Formosa isn't the only one in Venice; there are several others including this goofy guy protecting the campanile of the church of Santa Margherita. The church is deconsecrated and...

PhotoHunt: Scary

This week's PhotoHunt theme is "scary" This stone face is in Venice on the church of Santa Maria Formosa, over the entrance to the bell tower. It’s meant to be scary although these days, most people just find it...

Scuola dei Calegheri

Across the campo from the church of San Toma is the gothic Scuola dei Calegheri (Guild of the Cobblers or Shoe-makers). There’s another beautiful Madonna della Misericordia relief on the façade of the scuola and below that, a lunette over...

San Toma

No longer open to the public, this church is worth visiting anyway just because this neighborhood is so nice and also to see the beautiful relief of the Madonna on the outside of the church. The church is dedicated...

I Tolentini (San Nicolo da Tolentino)

There are a bunch of churches in Venice that look so beautiful from the side or back but not so hot from the front, and this is one of them. Jan Morris (The World of Venice) wrote, “The back...

San Nicolo dei Mendicoli

An enchanting church that is off-the-beaten path but so worth finding, this is one of my very favorites. It took several tries across several trips to finally get inside this church. Before my second trip to Venice, my friends Susan...

San Moise

A wooden church dedicated to San Vittore was built on this location in the 8th century; it was rebuilt in 947 by Venetian nobleman Moise Venier who rededicated it to his name saint, Moses (San Moise). This is one...

More about the bell towers

There’s something so magical about that first view of Venice after arrival, when you see the towers and domes in the distance as you make your way across the lagoon. It really looks like some kind of unearthly fairy...

Campanile di San Marco

In my December restoration report, I mentioned that they were putting scaffolding around the San Marco bell tower, and I found a couple of articles that explain what they are doing. This article states that, “The bell tower was...

Sant' Agnese

This Dorsoduro church has existed since at least the 11th century and has only recently reopened for public Mass. As far as I know, that’s the only way to visit it right now, and I'd really like to see...

Leaning Tower of San Pietro di Castello

This is one of the most beautiful campanili in Venice. The leaning tower in Pisa is more famous but Venice has more than one that's a bit wonky. In all honesty, nothing in Venice looks particularly straight but there...

San Giovanni Elemosinario

A hidden Rialto market church with a Titian on the high altar. San Giovanni Elemosinario (St. John the Almsgiver or Almoner) is a Byzantine saint more commonly honored by the Orthodox rather than the Catholic church. A wealthy 7th...

San Zan Degola (San Giovanni Decollato)

San Zan Degola is located in a small campo of the same name, and this is one of those magical places in Venice where you feel like you’ve traveled back in time. There are no other tourists, no glass...

Santa Maria Maggiore

A church that’s now part of Venice’s prison, this one’s got an interesting history with not one but two miracle-working Madonna legends. In the 1400’s, this was a remote and poor fishing neighborhood on the western shore of Venice...

Madonna dell' Orto

The most beautiful gothic church in town with one of the loveliest facades in Venice. Of all the many red brick-fronted churches, this one is special with its white stone tracery, trim, and sculpture.The church was originally named for...

San Giorgio Maggiore

One of Venice’s most beautiful and familiar vistas is the island of San Giorgio Maggiore and the great temple of a church that Palladio built there. Many artists have painted it, millions of tourists have photographed it, John Ruskin...

San Giorgio dei Greci

The Greek Orthodox cathedral with a leaning tower, this church is dedicated to San Giorgio (St. George), the charismatic dragon-fighting, princess-saving saint. It’s kinda cool that there are four churches in Venice dedicated to St. George – two Catholic, one...

Churches on the Lagoon Islands

Some of the oldest, most beautiful, and most magical churches are out in the lagoon - the two ancient churches on Torcello and Santi Maria e Donato on Murano are among my all-time favorites. This photo of Santa Fosca was...

The churches of San Marco

There are 19 churches in the sestiere of San Marco (which includes the island of San Giorgio Maggiore). My favorites in this sestiere are the Basilica, of course; San Salvador (a beautiful church with an amazing Titian Annunciation); and San...